Eddie Redmayne Web
11
Jun 2020
Ali

Eddie released a statement to Variety about recent tweets done by author J.K. Rowling.

Eddie Redmayne, star of the “Fantastic Beasts” franchise, is speaking out against J.K. Rowling’s anti-trans tweets, as the controversy surrounding the author and her beliefs continues to swirl.

“Respect for transgender people remains a cultural imperative, and over the years I have been trying to constantly educate myself,” Redmayne said in a statement provided to Variety. “This is an ongoing process.”

“As someone who has worked with both J.K. Rowling and members of the trans community, I wanted to make it absolutely clear where I stand,” he continued. “I disagree with Jo’s comments. Trans women are women, trans men are men and non-binary identities are valid. I would never want to speak on behalf of the community but I do know that my dear transgender friends and colleagues are tired of this constant questioning of their identities, which all too often results in violence and abuse. They simply want to live their lives peacefully, and it’s time to let them do so.”

Rowling, the creator of “Harry Potter” and its “Fantastic Beasts” spinoff series, posted a series of tweets on Saturday arguing that discussion of gender identity invalidates biological sex.

“If sex isn’t real, there’s no same-sex attraction. If sex isn’t real, the lived reality of women globally is erased. I know and love trans people, but erasing the concept of sex removes the ability of many to meaningfully discuss their lives. It isn’t hate to speak the truth,” Rowling wrote. “The idea that women like me, who’ve been empathetic to trans people for decades, feeling kinship because they’re vulnerable in the same way as women — ie, to male violence — ‘hate’ trans people because they think sex is real and has lived consequences — is a nonsense.”

Queer activists and organizations such as GLAAD, as well as fans of the series, denounced Rowling’s comments, noting that they denied the lived consequences of trans people’s experiences.

In addition to his work as Newt Scamander in “Fantastic Beasts,” Redmayne earned an Oscar nomination for his work in “The Danish Girl.” He played Lili Elbe, a Danish transgender woman who was among the early recipients of sex reassignment surgery.

On Tuesday, Daniel Radcliffe, who starred as Potter in the film series, also criticized Rowling’s remarks in an essay posted to the website of the Trevor Project, a non-profit dedicated to crisis intervention and suicide prevention for LGBTQ people. He noted that nearly 80% of transgender and non-binary youth are discriminated against due to their gender identity.

“Transgender women are women,” Radcliffe wrote. “Any statement to the contrary erases the identity and dignity of transgender people and goes against all advice given by professional health care associations who have far more expertise on this subject matter than either Jo or I.”

31
Mar 2020
Ali

Eddie has joined the Save With Stories campaign. This campaign is partnering with Save the Children and No Kid Hungry they are offering stories via Facebook and Instagram to provide fun and education for children while they are stuck at home during the coronavirus outbreak. You can help this important work by donating here.

Eddie is reading “Zog” By Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler (published by Scholastic and Scholastic UK). Such a fun book and I love how he does the voices.

31
Mar 2020
Ali

Eddie has a new campaign for OPPO, a global smart device brand. OPPO is sharing a look at the new campaign:

27
Mar 2020
Ali

Hello everyone! I wanted to take a moment to address what is happening in our world. Due to the Covid-19 situation I have had some major changes happening in my life to provide safety for my family and the other individuals around me. I have moved to a working from home environment, both of my daughters are home with me full-time, and my schooling has moved to online. Having said that I want to encourage each of you to do the same … take time to consider the state of our world and how YOU can help slow down the spread of this awful illness.

If you need something else to keep you busy … login to Amazon Prime Video and watch The Aeronauts … or login to Netflix and watch some of Eddie’s films like THe Danish Girl, The Theory of Everything, or My Week with Marilyn!

In the meantime I have added a shoot that Eddie did back in 2016 to our gallery for you to enjoy!

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > Outtakes > 2016 > 016

16
Dec 2019
Ali

At the end of last week Eddie attended the New York City Premiere of Finding The Way Home.

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2019 > December 11 | Finding The Way Home Premiere In New York City

10
Dec 2019
Ali

Eddie and Felicity attended the New York City screening of The Aeronauts last week.

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2019 > December 4 | The Aeronauts New York City Premiere

04
Dec 2019
Ali

On Nov. 20, 2019, Eddie participated in a phone interview with some of his fans that run sites and social media accounts dedicated to him to discuss his new film The Aeronauts and answer their questions. I feel so blessed to be able to participate and to learn more about Eddie through these interactions. His new film is amazing so I recommend going to theaters and seeing it when it gets released on Friday!

Thank you to all who helped make this interview possible.

Participants:
Eddie Redmayne (New York, USA)
Ali (Utah, USA)
Charlotte (Texas, USA) — Moderator
Erina (New Zealand)
Ivonne (London, England)
Marci (Oklahoma, USA)

Eddie: Hi, guys! How are we? This is becoming almost an annual call. It’s like, my friendly place, you know.

Charlotte: Well, that’s nice to hear. Does somebody want to moderate? Or I can do that…

Eddie: Why don’t you take the lead?

Charlotte: Ivonne is going to start. Do you want to ask your first question?

Ivonne: I actually got to see the film at the LFF [London Film Festival], and I thought it was a true cinematic experience. There is a line in the film said by Himesh Patel’s character to your character that goes something like: ‘You’ve been assigned the responsibility to change the world.’ And I was wondering, do you feel the role of cinema is as important as it has ever been given the tumultuous times that we tend to be living in these day?

Eddie: You guys! What an amazing question! I feel that the world — maybe I’m not specific to cinema or television or art — but I feel, you’re absolutely right. It could not be more vital at the moment. That art forms that not only reflect society but that can be used to expose elements of society, give us things to escape society, give us moments of sort of fantasy and things that engage us in all that is around us. One of the things I love about my job is that whatever film you’re doing, whether it’s a real character or not a real character, when you get to immerse yourself in the world of research around it, it always does change you in some ways by educating you. And I find that when I go to a cinema or I go to an art gallery, it’s constantly shifting and changing the prism through which you look at the world.

Charlotte: Even before you began filming The Aeronauts, you were telling us about how beautiful you found the script and how intimate and meaningful the storytelling is. Could you tell us — and the people we’re writing for — what makes The Aeronauts worth seeing, no matter what screen size they see it on?

Eddie: The very simple message of not letting other people put restrictions on aspirations, which is something, I suppose, that was also a theme of The Theory of Everything and some of the other films I’ve done is one that I believe keenly. So that was important to me. But the other thing was — and I’ve talked a lot about it in the press and I know you guys are super, very supportive, and secondly are aware of a lot of the things I say, but this idea of wonder. I find that so much of what we read and watch is incredibly sort of depressing, and I thought this had a notion of hope to it, and that it had an idea of the sublime and wonder to it that felt compelling to me. The reason I took on the film was of all the scripts I’d been reading, even though it was playing another scientist, period drama, English, there were scenes in it — when Felicity’s on top of that balloon — that as you read the script you just went, ‘I’m desperate to see that on a cinema screen or on a screen.’ And that was one reason, and the other was the pure challenge of can you keep an audience engaged when it’s two people’s intimate story against this macro backdrop. That’s what I found enticing.

Marci: You went up in an actual balloon for this film, which to a lot of people might seem pretty risky or extreme. Is that the most dangerous or daredevil thing you’ve done for a role, and if not, what is? And, were you nervous about going up in the balloon?

Eddie: You know, it probably is the most, well, is it the most? I think the most extreme thing I’ve done for a role is this moment in Jupiter Ascending in which I was sort of hung on these wires about 30 feet in the air without really knowing what would happen when I was spun around like 50 times, when the character was spinning through some gravity-free, weird — I had no idea what was going on there. I remember ignorance being blissful then because I had no idea what I was doing. It was the most, I suppose, terrifying on The Aeronauts, because of that story that I’ve recounted, but really the most important thing about that story — or not important but riveting thing was the total peace one second, because it was so quiet and you were having the most stunning views, beautiful landscape, to total carnage, chaos, noise and fear within a millisecond. And the only other one I’ve mentioned is the old Elizabeth I horse riding story which was on this huge steed with spurs on my feet, unable to ride, careering toward Helen Mirren and the cavalry. (Laughter) Those were probably the most terrifying moments.

Ali: In the film, your character, James, goes to great lengths to learn more about meteorology and expand that field. Is there any topic or idea that you would like to learn more about? Or are your films a way that you do that?

Eddie: The honest truth to that is that I’ve probably become a — I’m definitely excessive when there’s work involved, when I get a script and I know I’m doing it, whether it’s theater, films — I get a bit obsessive. I’m a bad reader generally — I’m a slow reader — but I find it very difficult to read anything other than things to do with the work when I’m sort of in it. So a few years ago I sort of submitted to that where I had guilt about not reading enough novels or not reading — I submitted to the idea that I’ll let the work dictate what I read up on. And I found that incredibly enjoyable. There are times, particularly when I’m working on a location somewhere, where I’ll want to go and get under the skin of the city you’re staying in, and I love that element. But for me, the things that remain are — I have a passion for art, and more and more recently a bit of anything about architecture. One of the joyful things recently when I was in Chicago, was getting to go on the architecture tour, and in the evenings when I walked back from filming and you’d get to study some of the buildings, and I found that lovely.

Continue Reading

08
Oct 2019
Ali

I have added a couple of outtakes from the photoshoot Eddie & Felicity did recently for next month’s British Vogue.

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > Outtakes > 2019 > 007

08
Oct 2019
Ali

Here are two of the interviews that Eddie did at last night’s premiere. I love how he talks about how he wanted to do something different and contemporary but how this script just spoke to him.



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